Thursday, September 26, 2013

The Arterial Self - Problem a

The Arterial Self - Problem a

A man is shopping with a friend and happens to pass by a window which has electric trains displayed. He falters before the exhibit, entranced by the memories which this begins to awaken, memories which largely are consisting of wanting and marveling and so forth.

The friend who is beside him is preoccupied with an itinerary and disinterested in the toy trains and so urges the man to continue their walking. He intimates, but the friend presses with some words which cajole him with a mock affection and a dismissal of his interest. He gives way and then does follow - although for the rest of the day he will be disturbed but not know why.



Commentary:
Immediately we may all understand this type of event. It describes the anomalies which exist even between good friends whereupon one may have no understanding of the other in a particular regard. However, in all peopled transactions there are further events conspiring and no simple occurrence is insignificant or without its outfall.

When we urge another or pressure for their agreement it is worth noting that even enthusiasm can injure if we are asking for a dishonesty from them, expecting a compliance. The variations of this are difficult to gauge however, because there are differing moods and frequencies of health and all manner of considerations which may well affect a man on any given day. So then the question is how best are we to interact with each man and woman affording their true natures without also compromising our own.

Firstly, we may view this problematically, and in the personal this is both necessary and articulate. If we can understand the transactional differences underlying soul-honesty we may then begin to see the insult to Christ when we forfeit our selves, and then how to avoid such decadence.

In the case of the man and the railway train window we know that he was experiencing something which was then important to him. It was not what one might call a religious experience, but it was arterially speaking, important. It caught his attention to the exclusion of all else, it worked in upon him and began to release thoughts and feelings which were submerged within his memory and even his longings.

Curiosity was stimulating his astral body and there was a subsequent tingling at all of his junctures and points, to fingertips and toe-tips. The adrenaline worked most naturally around this and so too his etheric body began to liven up, drawing about itself the forces which concentrate around the chest and head (or wherever there is such interest manifest).

A sensation of timelessness alleviated and elevated his time-consumed consciousness, absorbed and quite drawn out from his ego. Yet also participating with his ego, he had managed to direct his attention to the colorful parts moving around and around before him. This was a longing from the past awaiting to be answered. When he was interrupted in this experience his first reaction was to pull back and continue the fixation. But alas! He was sorely interrupted and imposed upon.

The insult added to the injury here, was not that the friend dismissed the interest as being unimportant, but that the man himself gave way and did not determine there and then his true feelings upon the matter. Men become so used to this effort of congeniality that they mistakenly believe that there is no consequence, and one could certainly set about to please all others before self and maintain that the higher good was concurrent, however it is not. No surrendering to another's ways and wants is beneficial unless it has been ordained by the Arterial Self as a natural act.

The Arterial Self is not a 'Higher Self' as described by the yogis or mystics, it is rather the preferential deliberating nature which has choice before it, and all choices can be good. The higher attributes could rightly select a poverty that requires a man to serve charity, and when his body deteriorates from hunger and overwork the 'higher' soul could be well satisfied, and yet the Arterial Self may protest this with good reason.

Here then is a distinction therefore between the two. It is not a case of the Arterial Self being immoral because it does not always choose the most righteous course of action, it is moreover because it knows its capabilities and what it can and cannot afford, and its preference.

Here we can see also that the spirit may dismiss the physical world's requirements, almost as unlawfully as the physical world's persistence upon the soul…. and deliberating the two is given to the over-ego, the Arterial Self, as opposed to the developing ego and its experiments into the bargain.

There has always been the question about instantaneous purity as sanctioned by the moralists, as becoming possible. Such a 'perfected' man who has contradicted his Arterial Self and with an immature capability that has forced himself beyond his means, may invoke the very opposite to that he has set out to achieve.

One of the reasons for this lies in the consequence to all actions depending upon their origin rather than their physical set sequence. A 'good' action from an inadequate man is moreover interpreted lastingly from the initial motivation as experienced within the Arterial Self, and if the Arterial Self is out of agreement with this action it shall become null and void. This is because there is a protection afforded the core self of a man, that he is liable moreover within his true nature and not out of it.

Conversely, if he were to suffer the dictates of his acting conscience (social conscience, spiritual guiding, whatever) and abstain from his favorite foods in order to diet, but the purpose was not agreed upon by his Arterial Self, he will not take advantage of any long-lasting health result. Also he will go back to preferring those foods he instinctively hungers for, and seek to satisfy that particular hunger. Here we can also suggest that the hunger and the foods themselves are not the critical issue. We can respect the man in his desires - and yea, the point is in that very respecting.

Goodness is its own reward, however insincere goodness is spiritually impotent. The significator has to remain with the core person and what they may achieve out from there; all else is superficial and of little lasting importance.

It may be that the individual’s Arterial Self comes to want for a complete change in diet, because out from their being comes the recollections of such relationships and interactions to foods, alongside a knowing that maintains what is required and needed for future sustenance. Then we find that the dynamics between that man and his nutrition give pleasures which can be experienced even in the simplest of foods. The first pleasure known is in the honesty of self and the compliance to need. Similarly, if not in the advanced relationship, then one can know this simply in the experience of eating the very foods you want the most. The pleasure comes in pleasing yourself, not so much as the substance of the food.

If taken incorrectly these passages may appear to promote an utterly self-centered and self-fulfilling lifestyle. This is not the reasoning of the meaning, but it is moreover a guide to understand what it feels like to be agreeable to oneself. Overindulgence is actually symptomatic of a soul who is not answering their Arterial Self, their true I Am, but living in compromise to it. So the most effective way to reestablish a pleasing of that self becomes prominent in basic codes, expressed in ways which otherwise would not be so excessive.

The importance of 'expressing oneself', albeit truthfully, has been maintained largely amongst the people who are habitually having to come to choices which seem to present and represent over and over begging their attention. Expression from a man does not have to be indicated by grandstanding or imposing around others, but communicating a genuine aspect that is in line with his true feelings and thoughts coming from the core.

Self-expression is creative, skilful and intuitive. Those who have poor vocabulary quite often improvise with an immediate honesty of gesture and face; and for those who are articulate the meanings implied or given, when genuine, are pleasing to those who receive them. There is a great pleasure in the giving and receiving of true genuineness.
- B.Hive
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